Transcript


Chuck Denney-Narrator (UT Institute of Agriculture)
At the Moore farm near Cleveland, 110 cows are milked twice a day. The farm also grows the crops to feed these animals. This is your typical hard-working dairy, but lately it’s also a science lab. UT Extension and UT AgResearch works with the owners of two Bradley County dairies to conduct studies. The project means knowledge for researchers and a management tool for farmers.

Kim Frady (UT Extension-Bradley County)
“The producers get a lot of access to things that can help them, and like you say, we get a lot of good information from them because we’re doing it in an on-the-farm setting.”

Chuck Denney
Here UT is studying a disease called mastitis – which reduces the amount of milk a cow produces, and impacts the quality as well. A cow with mastitis has a high somatic cell count, and UT AgResearchers and farmers are looking for ways to lower those numbers.

John Moore (Bradley County Dairy Producer)
“They take each month the top somatic cell count cows and they analyze as to what type of mastitis they have and whether or not it’s treatable.”

Chuck Denney
Producer John Moore is happy to lend his cows for this research because he wants to help the dairy industry. Moore wants to see mastitis wiped out in the future.

John Moore
“They take each month the top somatic cell count cows and they analyze as to what type of mastitis they have and whether or not it’s treatable.”

Chuck Denney
In Tennessee, we have about 55-thousand dairy cows. Bovine mastitis is a concern in all three regions of the state, and it’s estimated the disease costs our industry upwards of 15 million dollars each year.

Dr. Raul Almeida (UT AgResearch)
“Mastitis is an infection that happens in the mammary glands.”

Chuck Denney
Dr. Raul Almeida leads the work that’s done in UT’s Tennessee Milk Quality Laboratory in Knoxville. AgResearchers study samples from the test farms - all with a goal of reducing somatic cells and finding treatments for mastitis.

Dr. Raul Almeida
“We offer a service to the farmers through the lab in which we have a program to reduce the cell counts. We invite anyone who would want to participate and ask for our services to call.”

Chuck Denney
Milk processors penalize farmers for selling milk from cows with a certain level of somatic cells. And continued teamwork between research and the farm could be the key that leads to higher quality milk produced by our dairies.

END

NOTE: Producers interested in learning more about the “Tennessee Quality Milk Lab” can call 865-974-8672 or log on to this web site – www.tqml.utk.edu