Campus Rain Gardens: Opening opportunities for soaking in rainwater runoff and knowledge through experiential learning
Ludwig, A. L., B. P. Collett, N. R. Bumgarner, and C. E. Stewart.  2015.  25th Tennessee Water Resources Symposium.

Abstract:
Campus Rain Gardens: Opening opportunities for soaking in rainwater runoff and knowledge through experiential learning A. Ludwig, B. Collett, G. Ferry, N. Bumgarner and C. Stewart Rain gardens are an ever-growing component of low impact development in urban centers and residential development across the United States. The University of Tennessee has invested financial and human resources in creating a greener campus while expanding experiential learning opportunities by transitioning underutilized campus spaces into rain gardens. The need for training in low impact development design and construction is critical to the future of sustainable development and spans several academic disciplines. Eighteen states now have volume-based runoff reduction requirements for new development projects, and Tennessee has over 100 municipal permits that enforce such requirements. A suite of university classes took part in the planning and construction of the campus rain gardens, reflecting the interdisciplinary teams of trained professionals that are needed to retrofit a functional rain garden within an existing urban landscape. These gardens will also play a foundational role in Extension training for Master Gardeners and municipal stormwater professionals. The purpose of this paper is to showcase an effective approach at collaborations amongst faculty and university departments to pool knowledge and resources to create outdoor learning centers for generations of practitioners to come.