Jacqueline C. (Jacqui) Whittemore

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Jacqueline


Associate Professor
  Small Animal Clinical Sciences
  

ORCID:
0000-0003-2624-2262
Phone: (865) 974-8387
Email: jwhittem@utk.edu


Focus: Internal Medicine

Biographical sketch

Dr. Whittemore received her DVM from the University of California, Davis College of Veterinary Medicine in 2000. After two years in small animal general practice, she completed her residency in internal medicine and a PhD in clinical sciences at Colorado State University. She is an Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of Tennessee, College of Veterinary Medicine, where she also serves as the Acree Research Chair of Medicine.

Dr. Whittemore enjoys balancing the rigors of research, clinical practice in internal medicine, and teaching. Her major research focus is on identification and amelioration of adverse effects of exogenous therapies, such as antiplatelet, immunosuppressive, and antibiotic therapies, on the gastrointestinal tract and microbiome/metabolome of dogs and cats, with special attention given to the protective effects of probiotics. Secondary active areas of research include development and validation of veterinary simulators to minimize live animal use for veterinary training (for which she holds a patent), and development/validation of minimally-invasive techniques to decrease patient morbidity and improve outcome. Her research is continually fed by insights from her formative period in general practice, insightful comments from students and house officers, and management of complex cases on the clinic floor. When not buried in statistics or hunkered over records in the clinic, Dr. Whittemore can be found developing new online and hands-on resources for use in her immersive endoscopy courses for small animal specialists and technicians. To date, her small group, on-site course has been attended by over 150 people from 11 countries and 25 U.S. states. Dr. Whittemore is pleased to be unveiling an online-only version of her course this summer to broaden its impact and reach.