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Video


1 mention

Little River Facility 
It’s long been an issue in farming – how can we be productive in agriculture and still protect the environment? UT Ag-Research has a new facility dedicated to that cause.



1 mention

Gnats (Black Flies) 
In Tennessee’s warm months, gnats are a nuisance to people and animals. UT researchers are working to reduce the population by eliminating them before they’ve hatched from rivers and streams.



1 mention

Saving the Hemlock 
Scientists and staff at Great Smoky Mountains National Park race to save the hemlock tree from extinction in their park.



1 mention

Beetle Tents 
Hemlock trees in the Smoky Mountains are threatened by a tiny, deadly pest. Researchers with UT AgResearch are using a predatory beetle to feast on these harmful insects.



1 mention

Quonset Barn 
Most barns are square or rectangular, painted red, and with a loft to store hay. But now some Tennessee farmers are looking at a more-modern day barn built to last a long time.


 

Recent Publications

Year 2- Tricolored bat roost tree and cave hibernacula management in Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  Carpenter, G. M., E. V. Willcox, and R. F. Bernard.  2016.  National Park Service White-nose Syndrome Report FY 2016.

Status and roost selection of male tri-colored bats in the Great Smoky Mountains National Par.  Carpenter, G. M., E. V. Willcox, R. F. Bernard, and W. H. Stiver.  2016.  46th Annual Symposium of the North American Society for Bat Research.

Year 2- Anthropogenic structures used as summer roosts by bats in Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  Fagan, K. E., E. V. Willcox, and R. F. Bernard.  2016.  National Park Service White-nose Syndrome Report FY 2016.

Myotis leibi (eastern small-footed Myotis) roosting in buildings of Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  Fagan, K. E., E. V. Willcox, R. F. Bernard, and W. H. Stiver.  2016.  Southeastern Naturalist, 15: 23−27.

Roost selection by synanthropic bats in buildings of Great Smoky Mountains National Par.  Fagan, K.E., E. V. Willcox, R. F. Bernard, and W. H. Stiver.  2016.  46th Annual Symposium of the North American Society for Bat Research.

Evolution and Phylogeny of the Parasitoid Subfamily Phasiinae (Diptera: Tachinidae) Blaschke, J. D.  2015.  Ph.D. Dissertation.

Tricolored bat roost tree and cave hibernacula management in Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  Carpenter, G. M., E. V. Willcox, and R. F. Bernard.  2015.  National Park Service White-nose Syndrome Report FY2015.

Summer roosting ecology of tricolored bats in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  Carpenter, G. M., E. V. Willcox, R. F. Bernard, and W. H. Stiver.  2015.  69th Annual Conference of the Southeastern Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies.

Influence of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Infestation Levels on Water Stress in Eastern Hemlocks within the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, USA Coots, C., P. L. Lambdin, J. A. Franklin, J. F. Grant, and R. Rhea.  2015.  Forest, 6:271-279.

Anthropogenic structures used as summer roosts by bats in Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  Fagan, K., E. V. Willcox, and R. F. Bernard.  2015.  National Park Service White-nose Syndrome Report FY2015.

Survey and management of buildings used as summer roosts by bats in Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  Fagan, K., E. V. Willcox, R. F. Bernard, and W. H. Stiver.  2015.  69th Annual Conference of the Southeastern Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies.

Population Dynamics and Ecophysiology of Fraser fir (Abies fraseri) in the High Elevation Forests in the Southern Appalachian Mountains.  Kaylor, S.  2015.  Ph.D. Dissertation.